How to Setup a Remote Camera using Pocket Wizards
Sep22

How to Setup a Remote Camera using Pocket Wizards

This is gonna be a long guide to semi omni presence so lets skip my quirky banter and just dive right into it. In no order of importance the following pieces of equipment are  what I needed for me to successfully setup a remote camera and have it reliable shoot under most circumstances Equipment needed for remote camera 2 DSLR’s I shoot nikon so for me I’d be using any two of the following bodies D800, D7000, d300s or D2h. I do have a preference as to which bodies I pair though Pocket Wizard Pluss II, III, Multimax or Plus X (any will do, the multimax is best from what I now understand from using the Plus II and researching the Plus III and Multimax) Lens (I typically go wide angle as it suits my needs better) (Tokina 11 – 16 or sometimes I’ll use a nikon 18-200mm, it all depends though) Gaffer Tape (yes tape, McGyver wouldn’t have it any other way) Support System (Gorilla Pod, Super Clamp or if you got one an Fplate (something I’m contemplating picking up at some point when the budget allows)) Remote Release Cables for Pocket Wizard to Nikon 10pin and or nikon MC-DC2 Connector (I use the Flash Zebra versions, the oem pocket wizard remote cables are available as well for a few dollars more) Elastic Bands ( I actually tend to use those elastic scruchi things that i use to keep my locks out my face as they are more durable than cheap elastic band ) Camera Bag rain coat. (always something to keep from your old photo bags, they really come in handy)     Okay now that we’ve made our checklist of items required to pull of a successful remote camera setup lets walk through each element and set it up. Setting up your Remote Camera Grab your Camera’s in this case its a Nikon D300s ensure that your battery is fully charged. I use the MB-D10 battery grip so I get a boost in FPS as well as an additional battery in the camera So typically power is not an issue. Ensure your all set on storage as well, start with blank cards. and if your not doing this on a regular you should fix it. import your images make back ups and scrub your cards man it sucks when you run out of space on the job because of previous work on a card. Okay now lets get a lens on that remote camera and Do the same thing for the trigger camera as well. (i won’t walk you through that setup) Now grab both your pocket wizards set the Transmit mode to “both” from the three options...

Read More
Tools of the Trade: Pocket Wizard MultiMax added to wishlist
Sep18

Tools of the Trade: Pocket Wizard MultiMax added to wishlist

Once upon a time I had a b&h wish list. if it were to be printed on a scroll it would extend for days. That was in my more exuberant and wanting days, where i wanted every photography accessory and light modifier that was ever made apparently. Now a days my wish list’s are more specific towards particular needs. Currently I need a sure proof method of remotely triggering a camera as long as I’m in the specified range that the transceiver is designed and rated to work. So UHF or RF noise can not be a factor. Situation Lets look at my most recent situation while photographing horse racing using a remote camera triggered by a pocket wizard plus II. What I left out of that post was the reason for the inconsistent behaviour of the pocket wizards plus II’s. The race track still transmit the races via Ultra high frequencies the pocket wizard does not like this at all. When they’re transmitting if i’m not literally beside the remote camera it does not fire. Its like talking to that really hot girl in the club with all the right lines she’d respond to but the music is too loud, guess who’s not going home solo again. What I need is quiet zone or telepathy so to speak, cut through the noise and get my message delivered  and thats where the Pocket Wizard Multimax Comes in. Solution The Pocket Wizard Multimax, At first I looked at the pocket wizard plus III units as it also had 32 channels so I thought maybe it would helped but I think it would just be more channels for me to have the same UHF issues on. So i skipped on over to the Multimax page on the Pocket wizard website and this feature grabbed my interest. Noise Sniffer and Signal Strength Indicator If a MultiMAX radio has NOT been triggered, it acts as a Noise Meter and indicates steady noise in the area. If your radio has been triggered, the Signal Strength Indicator shows the strength of the last trigger received. This is useful to gain a quick view of the local noise level in the area you intend to shoot in so you can pick a channel with less interfering noise. If the above tools indicate excessive RF interference on your Custom ID’s frequency, you now have the option to Move your Custom ID to any PocketWizard frequency for better triggering in crowded shooting environments. What is a Custom ID? It is a private digital code that no one can trigger but you. It is offered as a premium service...

Read More
Remote Camera Setup complete
Oct16

Remote Camera Setup complete

It’s all finally been put together and seems like it’ll operate great in the field. The gorilla pod gives me the flexibility in providing support in a range of terrains and mounting scenarios. It was for that same reason that I went with the gorilla pod over a standard mounting plate. The pocket wizard plus II gives me good range, more than I’ll need for remotely triggering a camera at least and the giottos mini ballhead gives me the ability to get the camera leveled just how I need it to be. The only thing that I could use is a vertical viewfinder to aid in pre...

Read More